XIV. ABRAHAM LINCOLN, THE MCCORDS AND THE CIVIL WAR OF THE 1860'S

Abraham Lincoln's grandmother's sister and brother marry McCords-the Civil War and the McCords

A large number of McCords served in the Civil War as officers and enlisted men. Some served under General Robert E. Lee of the Confederacy and others under President Abraham Lincoln .

President Abraham Lincoln (Republican) Who Freed The Slaves

David McCord of Lincoln County, North Carolina in the 1780's married Anne Shipley, the sister of Lucy ( Mary) Shipley, the grandmother of Abraham Lincoln. David and Anne Shipley McCord moved to Boonesboro, Kentucky in 1789.

A brother of Lucy and Anne Shipley, George Shipley, had also married into the McCord family, marrying Elizabeth McCord in 1783 in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina where David McCord had lived earlier.

Robert Shipley, father of Anne, George, and Lucy Shipley had lived in Bedford County, Virginia before moving to North Carolina in the 1770's, holding land in Virginia later sold to John McCord, the eldest son of William McCord who built Ft. McCord in Pennsylvania.

The Shipleys and the John McCord moved to Lincoln and Mecklenburg Counties NC about the same time in 1777.

Abraham Lincoln's father had pioneered in Kentucky in the same period David McCord's sons and grandsons were pioneering in another county there.

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN'S ONE BOOK WAS THE BIBLE WHICH HE STUDIED BY THE LIGHT OF THE FIREPLACE

Abraham Lincoln's biographer wrote,

"He (Lincoln) was a man of deep religious feelings. The Bible was probably the only book his family ever owned. Abraham came to know it thoroughly.

"Biblical references and quotations enriched his later writings and speeches.

"As President, he kept a Bible on his desk and often opened it for comfort and guidance."

It is significant that our two greatest Presidents, George Washington and Abraham Lincoln were deeply religious men with a great faith in Christ.

"Another book which Lincoln later valued was Weem's Life Of Washington whom he greatly admired. Lincoln wrote,

" 'I remember all the accounts there given of the battle fields and struggles for the liberties of the country...and you all know...how these early impressions last longer than any other.'"

Abraham Lincoln's grandfather, also named Abraham Lincoln, had been a Captain in the American Revolution and had lived in Rockingham County, Virginia while in the Revolution. President Lincoln's  grandfather had been killed by the Indians after moving to Kentucky.


Other Early Pioneer McCords in Kentucky

Still another David McCord pioneered early in Kentucky, in 1789-90. This was David McCord, son of David McCord of Derry, Pennsylvania, and brother of James McCord Sr. who lived in Washington County, Tennessee from 1777-1799.


Henry Jackson McCord who served in the Civil War from the North kept an interesting diary of that service which has been preserved and handed down to us today.

Margaret Mitchell who wrote "Gone With The Wind" reportedly used as her model for 'Tara' the large home in the movie, a home belonging to the McCords in Georgia.

THE MAJOR CIVIL WAR BATTLES

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UNION SOLDIER UNIFORMS

CONFEDERATE UNIFORMS

James Allen McCord, Confederate Courier operating behind Union lines in the Civil War

James Allen McCord serving in the Civil War from Arkansas was a very youthful appearing teen-ager and Mounted Infantry private. By virtue of his boyish appearance and adventuresome nature he was able to serve as a courier on horseback operating behind Union lines carrying messages to and from the Arkansas and Texas Generals and the Confederate headquarters at Vicksburg, Mississippi.

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(from an original painting "...cross over the river" by Mort Kunstler, BookMark Ltd.)

James Allen McCord's grandfather, Osburn Black, lost his life at Vicksburg, and an uncle lost an arm in the last major battle at Vicksburg. James Allen McCord last saw his grandfather Black and talked with him under a large tree in Vicksburg just before the last major battle there.

THE BATTLE OF VICKSBURG, MISSISSIPPI

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Vicksburg Monument

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Vicksburg scene of battle


James Allen McCord was later captured and taken prisoner at The Battle of Pea Ridge Missouri and was in two Union prison camps thereafter.

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Headstone of James Allen McCord

A famous Texas General was killed at The Battle of Pea Ridge, Missouri. General Ben McCullough, former Texas Ranger Captain under General Sam Houston. Ben McCullough commanded the Texas troops at The Battle of Pea Ridge.


UNION TROOPS WERE HEADED TO CORINTH, MISSISSIPPI IN 1862 WHERE JAMES, JOHN AND OTHER MCCORDS LIVED AT THE TIME OF THE CIVIL WAR


CIVIL WAR MAP. UNION STATES ARE IN GREEN, CONFEDERATE IN BROWN. SPLIT STATES ARE IN TAN

A large number of McCords fought in Civil War battles from a wide variety of states in the North and South. A separate book could be written about them.