XV. THE GREAT WEST AND THE MCCORDS

By 1790, McCord families were living in most of the 13 original states and in the two Federal Territories, the Northwest Territory and the Southwest Territory. By 1820, there were over 400 McCord families in America, many out on the frontiers of the Great West

Arizona Territorial Governor Myron McCord governed an area ranging from these 12,000 foot mountains at Flagstaff in the north to desert areas 70 miles from the Gulf of California in the South. Wagon trains came through his Territory headed West to California

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One of the seven wonders of the world, Grand Canyon, 70 miles north of Flagstaff AZ

ARIZONA TERRITORIAL GOVERNOR MYRON MCCORD (REPUBLICAN)

Arizona Territorial Governor Myron McCord, a close friend of President William McKinley with whom he had earlier served in the U.S. Congress, was appointed by President McKinley to the Arizona Territorial Governorship in 1896.

While U.S. Representative from Wisconsin earlier, Myron McCord had a seat in the U.S. Congress adjoining that of Representative William McKinley from Ohio and they had become good friends.

PRESIDENT THEODORE ("Rough Rider") ROOSEVELT

Colonel Myron McCord had organized Arizona's two Volunteer Regiments during the Spanish American War for "Teddy" Roosevelt who headed up the Rough Riders from New Mexico, Arizona and Texas, and successfully captured Cuba. One group of volunteers in these two regiments went with Roosevelt to Cuba and Colonel Myron McCord's Regiment was trained for duty in the Philippines.

War had been declared against Spain after it sunk the U.S. Battleship Maine in Havana harbor.

After the Spanish-American War, President Roosevelt who succeeded President McKinley who had been assassinated by a leftist anarchist, appointed Myron McCord U.S. Marshal for the newly-formed State of Arizona.

Arizona was a wild and wooly country at that time and U. S. Marshal McCord rounded up and put in jail a number of the bad men including the head of the Arizona Rangers who had become corrupt.

Myron McCord earlier had been a newspaper editor in Wisconsin for nearly 20 years and edited a newspaper in Arizona before becoming its Territorial Governor. He was a popular Arizona businessman and Territorial Governor.


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(courtesy of The Thomas Gilchrest Institute of American History and Art, Tulsa, Oklahoma)

A Pioneer in the West

Colonel Paul Russell McCord served as an officer in the Mexican War shortly before the time this western painting portrays.


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1853 painting "The Lone Prospector" by Alburtus del Orient Browere

(courtesy National Geographic)

January 1998 marks the 150th anniversary of the first gold strike on the American River in Coloma, California in 1848 and the state will be celebrating the gold rush for the three years from 1998-2001. In exhibits at the Oakland Museum and at Sacramento and in Los Angeles, the state will show how the Gold Rush affected California's landscape, people and economy. Http://www.museumca.org will give the details of the Oakland Museum California tour. A tall-ship flotilla will sail up the California coast and there will be a reenactment of the Pony Express ride from St. Joseph, Missouri to Sacramento, California, according to National Geographic. For McCord families living in or near California or traveling there, information about these California celebration activities can be obtained from the California Sesquicentennial Commission at phone number 916-653-9599.

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Yosemite National Park

The California Gold Mines were just a few short miles from Yosemite Park shown above.

McCord men and families were in the California Gold Rush of the 1850's. Jack McCord was among Alaska's early settlers during the gold rush in that territory at the turn of the century. Many Americans headed West at that time

The painting below is "The Oregon Trail" painted in 1869. Courtesy of The Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio

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THE OREGON TRAIL

ROADS WEST TO CALIFORNIA AND OREGON

 

R. McCord, possibly on his way west to the California Gold Rush, carved his name on Independence Rock in Wyoming in the 1850's. His name can still be seen there.

"R. MCCORD JULY 4, 1850" INITIALS ON INDEPENDENCE ROCK, WYOMING

(courtesy of Howard McCord)

A SCENE IN UTAH WHICH COULD HAVE BEEN SEEN BY THE EARLY PIONEERS HEADED WEST

This mountain winter scene would have been familiar to some of the early McCords going west to Utah and California.

Wagon trains at Medicine Bow Creek, Rocky Mountains

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Western buffalo hunt by the Indians

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"Moving Up To The Summer Range"

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"On September 16, 1893 the rich Cherokee Outlet was opened for settlement in Oklahoma's greatest land rush."

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On April 22, 1889 1.9 million acres in central Oklahoma was declared open for settlement

Young James Welch--grandfather of McCord society members Robert Dale McCord and great-grandfather of J.Lynn Moss--made this run with his father. For a time James Welch later lived with an Indian family who wanted to adopt him. James Welch eventually settled near Waurika, Oklahoma where he raised his family.


WAGON TRAINS WEST!