Ft. McCord (1756): Marker near Chambersburg, PA

Over 100 McCords served in the American Revolution.

11 of them were with General Washington at Valley Forge in the bitter winter of 1777-78.

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A SIGNIFICANT NEW AMERICAN HISTORY BOOK, INTERACTIVE AND MULTIMEDIA, ABOUT THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR, AND THE OPENING OF THE GREAT WEST

McCord Online Publications

ISBN No. 0-914286-15


Second American Publication

Copyright (c) 1997-2005 by James McCord

All rights reserved.

Published Online in the United States by McCord  Publications

Publisher's Cataloging-in-Publication Data

James McCord

The American Revolution and the McCords

(The McCord Family of America: The First 150 Years (1720-1870) Volume I)

1. The McCord Family

2. United States

3-Politics and Government-18th and 19th century.

4. United States-History-American Revolution-French and Indian War-Founding Father Period-Opening of The Great West-Biographies.

5. United States-History-Religion-American Revolutionary and Founding Father Periods.

6. History of the Scotch-Irish in America

ISBN 0-914286-15

The two principal categories of the nature of this book are HISTORY and EDUCATION.

As a HISTORY book its categories are:

1. AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR AND FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR HISTORY;

2. HISTORY OF THE SCOTCH-IRISH IN AMERICA;

3.HISTORY OF THE MCCORD FAMILY OF AMERICA; and

4. HISTORY OF RELIGION IN AMERICA DURING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY PERIOD 1776-1783 AND THE FOUNDING FATHER PERIOD 1774-1825.

As an EDUCATION book, its categories are:

GOVERNMENT, HISTORY, and SOCIAL SCIENCES.

As a book published in its entirety online on the Internet, this book is:

Both INTERACTIVE and MULTIMEDIA.


Permission required in writing to reprint in part or whole in other publications.

Online copy of this book: ISBN 0-914286-15. First published online in 1997.

Print copy of this book: ISBN 0-914286-16. First published in print 2005.

Published Online in the United States by McCord Publications.(c) 1997-2005 James McCord. All rights reserved. 

This book online is at www.McCordPubl.com.

Print copies of this book may be obtained from:

McCord Publications, P.O. Box 471, Leola PA 17540-0471


There were over 6500 Internet online "hits" of this book and its related website during the month of March 1998 alone. The book had only been published online for four months at that time, since December 1997.

This is the equivalent of over 6500 individuals taking a book off a shelf in a public library in one month alone and looking at it.

This is the online equivalent of a best seller.

In addition, the next month, April 1998, the "hits" increased 25% over March 1998, to 8174 during the month of April. The number of hits have increased since that date.

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION ONE

I.     INTRODUCTION

II.    MAPS OF THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR

III.   THE MCCORDS AND THE SCOTCH IRISH

IV.    NEW YORK MCCORDS IN THE REVOLUTION

V.      VIRGINIA MCCORDS IN THE REVOLUTION

VI.     THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR OF 1750'S

VII.    INDIAN TRAILS AND 1763 MAP

VIII.   PENNSYLVANIA MCCORDS IN THE REVOLUTION

IX.      NORTH CAROLINA MCCORDS IN THE REVOLUTION

X.        SOUTH CAROLINA MCCORDS IN THE REVOLUTION

XI.       KENTUCKY, DANIEL BOONE AND THE MCCORDS

XII.      THE SOUTHWEST TERRITORY AND THE MCCORDS

XIII.     TENNESSEE, SAM HOUSTON AND TEXAS INDEPENDENCE

XIV.      ABRAHAM LINCOLN, THE MCCORDS AND THE CIVIL WAR OF THE 1860'S

XV.        THE GREAT WEST AND THE MCCORDS

XVI.       OTHER MILITARY AND PUBLIC SERVICE OF THE MCCORDS

 

SECTION TWO

A PICTORIAL HERITAGE

I. OUR GREAT HERITAGE: GOD

II.OUR GREAT HERITAGE: FAMILY AND COUNTRY

Endpage: The purpose of this book

 



THE MCCORDS IN AMERICA: THE FIRST 150 YEARS (1720-1870) VOLUME I

 

Seven original McCord families came to America from Northern Ireland and Scotland and settled in Pennsylvania, New York, Virginia, and South Carolina in 1720-1738. Over 60 of their descendants served in the 1776 American Revolution. By 1790, McCords were then living in most of the 13 original states and by 1820 over 400 McCord families were living in America, many as the very earliest settlers of many of the Southern, Midwestern, Northwestern and Western States.

I. INTRODUCTION

A PICTORIAL SKETCH OF THE TIMES

SECTION ONE

MCCORD CREST

McCord Crest as drawn by the Herald Artist of the Lord Lyon's Office in Edinburgh, Scotland 


 

SOME MCCORD FAMILIES IN THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

McCord families were there when American history was being made, from the time of the French and Indian War of the 1750's, the American Revolution of 1776-83, during the Founding Father period to 1800, the opening of the Great West of the 1800's, the Civil War, and later. This section is a pictorial overview of the early period and the legacy left to us of reverence for God, fidelity to country, and love of family.

GEORGE WASHINGTON

George Washington was America's first President and its greatest leader in our nation's history. His greatest ability was his coolness under fire, his wartime strategy conserving his American troops until they could become victorious, his knowledge of men and how they could under his good leadership be made to work together for victory, and his great ability to inspire his men. Many of them literally worshipped him for they found him a man of impeccable integrity and absolute honesty.

Over 100 of the McCords served in the American Revolution in General George Washington's Continental Army and in the state militias organized to fight the British for liberty and independence. Some died in that war. The names of the 100 plus McCords who served in the American Revolution appear later in this book, in chapter 16.

McCords were in most of the major battles of the American Revolution. Four McCords served with George Washington at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

One McCord family had a father, William, and 3 sons who served in the American Revolution and some of them were with General George Washington when he was at Valley Forge in the winter of 1777-78 .

George Washington Praying at Valley Forge, near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

This is perhaps the most famous of all paintings about George Washington who led the American Army during the American Revolution, Washington in prayer.

The owner of the land on which Valley Forge is located near Philadelphia said that he observed General Washington praying many times in the snow while Washington's troops were there in the winter of 1777-78. Washington was known for the regularity and faithfulness in his daily prayers.

Washington was a deeply religious man and wanted his troops to have the benefit of Christian worship.

During the French and Indian War of the 1750's, Washington hounded the Virginia Colonial government until they sent Chaplains to his units. He stated that they were vitally needed for the spiritual needs and morale of the men.


Earlier, many McCords were in the French and Indian War in which Washington also served. Ft. McCord, Pennsylvania was memoralized by a Pennsylvania historical society in that war.

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Ft. McCord Road on Route 4008 near Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, site of Ft. McCord which was attacked April 1, 1756 by Indians. several men killed, and captives taken including Mary McCord

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Ft. McCord homesite of William McCord near Chambersburg. Above home is that of Bossert family who purchased farm from McCords in 1790's. Site of Ft. McCord is a few feet away

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Marker at Ft. McCord where 27 men, women and children killed or captured April 1, 1756. Their names are on this monument marker plate

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Ft. McCord farm where fort stood. Parnell's Knob mountain is in background

(photographs above courtesy of Douglas McCord)


Washington's Religious Faith (continued)

George Washington led the Virginia militia troops in the French and Indian War in Pennsylvania.

Washington insisted that his troops march each Sunday to worship service in formation. Attendance was mandatory unless the particular soldier was on guard or patrol duty or disabled.

Washington was a warden in his Anglican church in Alexandria, Virginia before the Revolution and during the Revolution he attended Presbyterian church services for communion when he could do so. During the Revolution the Anglican church pastors did not generally support the Revolution. The Presbyterian and Congregationalist pastors did so.

Washington had many Chaplains in his Revolutionary Army, his so-called "Soldiers of God." They came primarily from the Presbyterian and Congregationalist Churches and played a vital role in his army.

Many of the American military leaders, leaders of militia companies during the French and Indian War, were ministers who took off their cloaks and took up arms as militia company captains during that war, leading men from their congregations into service.

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MAJOR GENERAL REVEREND JOHN PETER MUHLENBERG FROM THE VALLEY OF VIRGINIA NEAR WINCHESTER

Washington's brigadier general from Virginia during the American Revolution, and whose troops were with him at the final victory at Yorktown, Virginia, John Peter Muhlenberg, was a Protestant minister of a church of Valley of Virginia frontiersmen.

It is reported that at his final sermon in his church in Virginia at the beginning of the American Revolution, he spoke from the pulpit wearing his customary pastor's cloak. At the end of his sermon, he took off the cloak and underneath was wearing the uniform of a general in Washington's army. He reportedly then walked from the church leading many of his congregation into Washington's army behind him

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1782 painting of George Washington by John Trumbull. The Battle of Yorktown was less than one year old when this painting was made. Trumbull was the most famous artist of the American Revolution

John Trumbull was an aide to George Washington and knew his senior staff and generals well, including Brigadier General Daniel Morgan from Virginia. Trumbull was with Morgan at The Battle of Saratoga, New York and created a painting of him in his tan-gray buckskin uniform in victory there.

Washington's general from Virginia, the minister John Peter Muhlenberg described above, was with Washington at Yorktown, the concluding battle of the American Revolution in 1781.

SURRENDER OF THE BRITISH AT YORKTOWN IN 1781


The sermons and printed literature of ministers was the literature most read by the American people and was the most influential of all documents read by Americans during and just before the Revolution, exhaustive studies of the literature of that time has documented. More will be written on this subject in succeeding chapters of this book.

It would be difficult if not impossible to overestimate the role of the wives of the American Revolutionary soldiers and Founding Fathers in the success of the American Revolution and the establishment of this nation. It could not have happened without their support in every way, especially religiously. They also ran the farms, schooled the children, supported their husbands with funds and clothing and food, and were an immeasurable morale support to them and the Revolutionary cause. Their role will be covered more in detail in Volume II.

Today, 87% of Americans describe themselves as Christians, 3% as Jews, and the remainder of other faiths. At the time of the American Revolution the percent who were Christians was even higher since those of the Jewish faith did not emigrate to America from Eastern Europe until after 1800. Thus the Jewish population was infinitesimally small during the American Revolution, only a fraction of 1%, the remaining Christian population nearing 99%.

America was truly a Christian nation in 1776-83 and during the time of the Founding Fathers. It is so today by the religious preferences of its citizens.

A substantial number of McCords since 1720 have served God and their fellow man as ministers and missionaries.

James McCord, the second McCord to come to New York in 1732 is thought to have possibly come to America as a lay missionary and circuit rider for the Presbyterian church in Westchester county.

Several McCords in Alabama in the mid-1800's were ministers.

Two McCord family members in the late 1800's were missionaries, one to Japan and one to China. Reverend Langdon Cheves McCord of South Carolina was a missionary to Japan. He was married to Mary Fletcher of Accomack, Virginia. Sarah Taylor McCord, daughter of Hannah Cheves McCord (born 1843, died 1872) was married to Robert Wilson of Vermont who was a missionary to China.

James McCord, a medical doctor who established the first nursing school and hospital in South Africa in the late 1800's went there as a medical missionary to the Zulu Tribe. He was later a commissioned officer (M.D.), first in the British Army and later in the American Army, in World War I.

James McCord was one of the Presidents of Princeton Theological Seminary serving it during part of the last half of this century.

Among those McCord family members who are today serving God and their fellow man as ministers in America and abroad are Michael and Julia Anne McCord, serving as missionaries in Africa today. Other McCord Society members are ministers in a variety of denominations.

The Scotch-Irish McCords would have been comfortable in this mountain church. Many of the early McCords lived in the foothills of Pennsylvania, Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee